Frequently Asked Questions

1. How do I notify the IRS my address has changed?
2. Is there an age limit on claiming my child as a dependent?
3. If I claim my daughter as a dependent because she is a full-time college student, can she claim her own personal exemption when she files her return?
4. Can I receive a tax refund if I am currently making payments under an installment agreement or payment plan for a prior year's federal taxes?
5. For head of household filing status, do you have to claim a child as a dependent to qualify?
6. I retired last year, and started receiving social security payments. Do I have to pay taxes on my social security benefits?
7. Why should I choose TAX Experts to do my taxes?
8. When is the deadline to file my taxes?
9. What paperwork should I bring to my tax interview?
10. Can I claim charitable donations without a receipt?
11. Can my spouse and I file our tax return together if we are legally separated and not divorced?
12. Why is my refund less than I expected?

1. How do I notify the IRS my address has changed?

Answer :

There are several ways to tell us your new address:

Methods to Change Your Address

Method

Action

Tax return

Use your new address on your tax return

IRS form

Use Form 8822 (.pdf), Change of Address or Form 8822-B (.pdf), Change of Address or Responsible Party - Business

Written statement

Send us a signed written statement with your:

  • full name
  • old address
  • new address
  • Social Security number (or individual taxpayer identification number or employer identification number)


Mail your statement to the address where you filed your last return

Oral notification

You can tell us in person or by telephone. We'll need to verify your identity and address. Please have ready the information we have on file for you, such as:

  • your full name
  • your address
  • your Social Security number (or individual taxpayer identification number or employer identification number)

 

2. Is there an age limit on claiming my child as a dependent?

Answer :

To be claimed as your dependent, your child must meet the qualifying child test or the qualifying relative test. To meet the qualifying child test, your child must be younger than you and, as of the end of the calendar year, either be younger than 19 years old or be a student and younger than 24 years old. There is no age limit on claiming your child as a dependent if the child meets the qualifying relative test.

As long as all of the following tests are met, you may claim a dependency exemption for your child:

  • • Qualifying child or qualifying relative test,
  • • Dependent taxpayer test,
  • • Citizen or resident test, and
  • • Joint return test.
3. If I claim my daughter as a dependent because she is a full-time college student, can she claim her own personal exemption when she files her return?

Answer :

If you claim an exemption for your daughter as a dependent on your income tax return, she cannot claim her own personal exemption on her income tax return.

  • • If an individual is filing his or her own tax return, and the individual can be claimed as a dependent on someone else's return, the individual cannot claim his or her own personal exemption.
  • • In this case, your daughter should check the box on her return indicating that someone else can claim her as a dependent.
4. Can I receive a tax refund if I am currently making payments under an installment agreement or payment plan for a prior year's federal taxes?

Answer :

No. As a condition of your installment agreement, any refund due to you in a future year will be applied against the amount that you owe.

  • • The IRS will automatically apply the refund to the taxes owed.
  • • You must continue making your installment agreement payments as scheduled and in full, because your refund is not applied toward your regular monthly payment; therefore any payments due under the installment agreement must still be made in full.
  • • Regardless of whether you are participating in an installment agreement or other payment arrangement with the IRS, you may not get all of your refund if you owe certain past-due amounts, such as federal tax, state tax, a student loan, or child support. For more information on these non-IRS refund offsets, you can contact the Bureau of Fiscal Service (BFS) at a toll-free number 800-304-3107.
5. For head of household filing status, do you have to claim a child as a dependent to qualify?

Answer :

In certain circumstances, you do not have to claim the child as a dependent to qualify for head of household filing status; for example, a custodial parent may be able to claim head of household filing status even if he or she released a claim to exemption for the child.

6. I retired last year, and started receiving social security payments. Do I have to pay taxes on my social security benefits?

Answer :

Social security benefits include monthly retirement, survivor, and disability benefits. They do not include supplemental security income (SSI) payments, which are not taxable. The amount of social security benefits that must be included on your income tax return and used to calculate your income tax liability depends on the total amount of your income and benefits for the taxable year.

To find out whether any of your benefits may be taxable, compare the base amount for your filing status with the total of:

  • • One-half of your benefits.
  • • All of your other income, including tax-exempt interest.

The base amount for your filing status is shown next:

  • • $25,000 if you are single, head of household, or qualifying widow(er),
  • • $25,000 if you are married filing separately and lived apart from your spouse for the entire year,
  • • $32,000 if you are married filing jointly.
  • • $-0- if you are married filing separately and live with your spouse at any time during the tax year.

If you are married and file a joint return, you and your spouse must combine your incomes and social security benefits when figuring the taxable portion of your benefits. Even if your spouse did not receive any benefits, you must add your spouse's income to yours when figuring if any of your benefits are taxable, if you file a joint return.

7. Why should I choose TAX Experts to do my taxes?

Answer :

Are you one of nearly half of all American taxpayers overpaying the IRS? Could you be repeating the same mistakes or overlooking deductions year after year? TAX Experts professional thoroughly examine each customer's tax situation to get every deduction, credit, and tax advantage possible. We pledge quality tax preparation coupled with premier customer service at each location.

8. When is the deadline to file my taxes?

Answer :

The standing deadline for personal taxes is April 15. However, sometimes that date falls on a weekend or after Emancipation Day (a holiday in DC) and pushes the deadline to as late as April 17.

9. What paperwork should I bring to my tax interview?

Answer :

Below is a list of documents to bring with you to your tax interview. A copy of this list, along with what to expect during your interview,

PERSONAL INFORMATION FOR EACH FAMILY MEMBER:

    1. Full Name

  • a. Date of Birth
  • b. Social Security Card /ITIN/ATIN
  • c. Last Year's Tax Return
  • d. Valid Driver's License

INCOME AND TAX INFORMATION:

  • e. W-2's
  • f. Interest (1099-INT or substitute)
  • g. Dividend Slips (1099-DIV or substitute)
  • h. Stock Sales (1099-B or Broker Statement)
  • i. Self-Employment Income and Expenses
  • j. Sale of a Personal Residence
  • k. Rental Income and Expenses
  • l. Sale of any Business Assets
  • m. Gambling or Lottery Winnings (W-2G for some winnings)
  • n. State Income Tax Refund (1099-G)
  • o. Pension Income (1099-R)
  • p. Estimated Taxes Paid
  • q. Social Security or Railroad Retirement (SSA-1099 or RRB-1099)
  • r. IRA or 401(k) Distribution (1099-R)
  • s. Unemployment Compensation (1099-G)
  • t. Miscellaneous Income (1099-MISC)

DEDUCTIONS/ADJUSTMENTS:

  • u. Medical Expenses
  • v. Real Estate or Personal Property Taxes
  • w. Mortgage Interest
  • x. Charitable Contributions (cash and non-cash)
  • y. Employee Business Expenses
  • z. Gambling Losses
  • aa. Moving Expenses
  • bb. Traditional IRA Contributions
  • cc. Higher Education Expenses
  • dd. Educator Expenses
  • ee. Student Loan Interest

TAX CREDITS:

  • ff. Child Care Provider/Address and Employer Identification Number (EIN) or Social Security Number (SSN)
  • gg. Adoption Expenses
  • hh. Retirement Savings Contributions Credit
10. Can I claim charitable donations without a receipt?

Answer :

Yes, you can as long as you keep good records in case you are ever audited by the IRS. Be sure to record the name of the organization, the date and location, as well as a detailed description of what you donated. Keep notes on the amount you claimed as a deduction and how you figured the fair market value on the items you donated. In the case of a monetary donation, as long as it's less than $250, a canceled check or even a payroll deduction can suffice for proof of the donation.

11. Can my spouse and I file our tax return together if we are legally separated and not divorced?

Answer :

If your divorce is not final, you may choose to file married filing jointly. Just note, that you and your spouse are responsible for the tax bill and any future audits.

12. Why is my refund less than I expected?

Answer :

Many factors can contribute to why your refund is less than you expected. You have to consider the three elements that define a refund: your taxable income, the amount withheld from your paycheck for federal and state taxes, and your tax rate. If you aren't getting as much money back try to look on the bright side – you didn't give the IRS a zero-interest loan.